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Oklahoma State University

The lasting legacy of Marvin Stone

Tue, October 11, 2016
Publication: 
Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources
The late Marvin Lyle Stone, a Regents professor emeritus, was a DASNR faculty member in the department of biosystems and agricultural engineering from 1982 to 2006. Marvin Stone and his wife, Bonnie, passed away Oct. 24, 2015, after being struck by an automobile at the OSU Homecoming Parade. Stone’s legacy will live on through his world-renowned work in biomedical engineering, sensor technology and more. Photo/Todd Johnson

The late Marvin Lyle Stone, a Regents professor emeritus, was a DASNR faculty member in the department of biosystems and agricultural engineering from 1982 to 2006. His work is known worldwide in his career field, with students and stakeholders benefitting from his knowledge gained through years of unique biomechanical engineering service to the U.S. and international heavy equipment industry.

“Dr. Stone never stopped teaching,” said Meg Sheehan, a BAE senior who also works in the biosensors laboratory. “It was hard to remember that he actually retired because he never actually left. I hope in my future career that I can teach like he did.”

The university recognized Stone as its 2005 recipient of the OSU Eminent Faculty Award, the highest distinction given to a faculty member, and as its 2002 recipient of the OSU Regents Distinguished Teaching Award, presented to the university’s top instructor.

Stone’s research expertise focused on two major technological areas, international equipment communication and diagnostic protocol standards and high-speed, selective, point-specific field application of chemicals.

He was a key member of DASNR’s interdisciplinary research team that developed the landmark GreenSeeker® optical sensor system, honored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2002. Adopted worldwide, this groundbreaking technology precisely measures crop needs in real time, allowing a producer to apply only the needed amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals, thus reducing waste of those inputs while potentially improving yields, decreasing nitrogen costs and promoting improved environmental stewardship.

Stone also was involved in the formation and expansion of the Oklahoma Mesonet. A world-class network of 120 automated environmental monitoring stations covering the state, Mesonet information is a common fixture in reports issued by Oklahoma weathercasters and the National Weather Service.

Marvin Stone and his wife, Bonnie, passed away Oct. 24 after being struck by an automobile at the OSU Homecoming Parade.

By Donald Stotts

College News Network

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