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Niblack scholarships create career opportunities
Katherine Janike, a 2014-15 Niblack Research Scholar, works on her research project in a nutritional sciences lab at Oklahoma State University. Niblack scholars have been named for 2017-18. Undergraduate students at Oklahoma State University have been named 2017-18 Niblack Research Scholars. The Division of the Vice President for Research awarded scholarships to 13 students who receive $8,000 scholarships and the opportunity to conduct research guided by faculty sponsors and graduate student mentors. The Niblack Research Scholars program is an eye-opening experience that can jumpstart the careers of student researchers. Many Niblack scholars continue cutting-edge research in graduate programs at OSU and elsewhere while working with some of the nation’s most respected scientist, engineers and scholars. “For the vast majority of undergraduates involved in research, the experience forms a vital part of their university education, regardless of their career paths,” said OSU Vice President for Research Kenneth Sewell. “But for those who pursue graduate degrees and research-oriented careers, this type of intensive undergraduate research experience is a potent accelerator for their success.” The annual program is funded by OSU alumnus John Niblack and his wife, Heidi Niblack. As an undergraduate at OSU, Niblack says his research experience impacted the direction of his life. Niblack graduated from OSU in 1960 and, after graduate studies, conducted research and managed the development of many well-known pharmaceuticals for Pfizer Inc., the $34 billion global company. He was eventually named Pfizer vice chairman and, following retirement, founded the Niblack Research Scholarship to offer OSU undergraduates the same research opportunity he had. 2017-18 scholars, research areas and hometowns: OKLAHOMA Rendi Rogers, microbiology Adair Kylie Hagerdon, chemistry Choctaw Matthew Hart, nutritional sciences Edmond Caroline Graham, microbiology Midwest City Grace Ogden, plant and soil sciences Muskogee Kassidy Ford, microbiology Oklahoma City Emily Gietzen, microbiology Pryor Victoria Pickens, entomology and plant pathology Sand Springs Savannah Morris, biochemistry Stillwater ARKANSAS Taylor Walton, integrative biology Hot Springs CALIFORNIA Jeffrey Krall, integrative biology Mission Viejo ILLINOIS Erin Heilman, geology Third Lake IOWA Sage Becker, animal science Keota Visit niblack.okstate.edu for program information.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/niblack-scholarships-create-career-opportunities
Thu, 25 May 2017 09:35:40 -0500
OSU Chief Facilities Officer announced
Ron Tarbutton Oklahoma State University has named Ron Tarbutton as Chief Facilities Officer for OSU Facilities Management. Tarbutton was chosen following a nationwide search.  He had been serving as the interim CFO for the last 10 months.  Prior to that role he was Director of Operations and Maintenance for three years where he was responsible for reorganizing the maintenance structure at OSU into zones to improve customer service.   “I have high expectations for customer service at Facilities Management, and believe in the value of collaboration, cooperation and teamwork,” Tarbutton said.   Tarbutton earned his bachelor of science degree from OSU before serving as an officer in the U.S. Air Force as an electrical engineer.  He earned his Master of Business Administration from the University of Dallas. Before joining OSU, he was the Director of Physical Plant for Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas. He also has a broad range of facilities management experience in commercial and hospital facilities. 
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-chief-facilities-officer-announced
Thu, 25 May 2017 09:38:01 -0500
Joan Lunden keynote highlights annual Women for OSU Symposium
Organization names Philanthropist of the Year, awards 10 scholarships Women for Oklahoma State University awarded $43,020 to 10 students during its Symposium on April 27th at Gallagher-Iba Arena. Pictured are, from left: (front) Karlie Wade, an agricultural communications and pre-law sophomore from Perry, Oklahoma; Darci Klein, a counseling psychology doctoral student from St. Louis, Missouri; Wendy Lau Wong, an industrial engineering and management junior from Panama City, Panama, and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Sulochana Paudyal, an entomology doctoral student from Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal; (back) Christina Anaya, an integrative biology doctoral student from Fallbrook, California; Megan DeVuyst, an agribusiness junior from Morrison, Oklahoma; Courtney Mapes, an animal science junior from Alva, Oklahoma; Krista Boston-Fullerton, an educational leadership and policy studies doctoral student from Stigler, Oklahoma; and Abbey Grimes, a microbiology sophomore from Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Women for Oklahoma State University hosted its ninth annual Symposium last month, highlighted by a keynote speech from one of the most recognizable women in America, Joan Lunden. The organization awarded 10 scholarships totaling $43,020, which were both records. Also, Linda Cline was recognized as the Philanthropist of the Year at the event that drew 510 attendees. This was the second year in a row that the high demand for tickets led to the event being held at Gallagher-Iba Arena, with the tables covering Eddie Sutton Court. Joan Lunden Lunden’s speech discussed her path from being a “weather girl” in Sacramento to anchoring the evening news and eventually 19 years as co-host of Good Morning America. She also talked about her battle with triple negative breast cancer, which was diagnosed in June 2014 and required chemotherapy, surgery and radiation. “When the going gets tough, you can’t quit,” Lunden said. “You have to hang in there and believe you’re going to make it. … Sometimes the most important things we say all day are the things we tell ourselves. ‘Yes, I can do this.’” She also talked about balancing her successful career and private life, including being a mother of seven. She included inspirational messages such as, “We are all writing our life’s story and the pen is in our hands,” and, “You have to be willing to risk not being great for the chance to learn how to do something great.” Cline, who owns Char-Lin Ranch in Cushing, received the prestigious Philanthropist of the Year award for her support of many needs at OSU and in her community. She memorialized her husband by providing a major gift to name OSU’s state-of-the-art Charles and Linda Cline Equine Teaching Center. It includes a teaching barn with stalls for foaling mares, a small indoor arena, classroom, conference room, feed and tack room, wash rack, treatment area and offices. OSU Extension Services can utilize it to host workshops and learning opportunities for students, 4-H clubs and FFA chapters, as well as the general public. Linda Cline “I think you just get led to do things,” Cline said. “I just do what I think might be helpful and what I want to do. It’s just seeing the need and saying, ‘Is that a place I want to help? Do they need help?’” The Clines bought what they expected to be their retirement property outside Cushing in 1985. They later purchased the 17 horses that established the ranch that peaked at more than 2,500 cattle and 300 horses, earning more than 200 world and reserve world championships before downsizing in recent years.   The Clines did not attend OSU but credited much of Char-Lin Ranch’s success to the university’s faculty visiting the ranch, working with and teaching them, as well as the treatment their animals received at the OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. That led to a long-running relationship with the university’s equine program, which they supported through donations as well as opening their operation to student tours and hiring countless OSU students. They also allowed the Department of Animal Science to use their animals for teaching opportunities, judging team practice, clinics and contests. They even donated several world-class horses to improve the genetics of OSU’s teaching herd and endowed a professorship. Ayrianna Swanson In addition to Oklahoma State University, Linda Cline also supports the Right Path Riding Academy; the Special Olympics; Love, I.N.C.; Shiloh Camp; and the American Quarter Horse Association. She is also active in the First United Methodist Church of Cushing.  Amy Mitchell, an alumna and chair of Women for OSU, provided an update on the organization, including some impressive statistics. The group has awarded $187,370 in scholarships to 49 students during its nine-year history. It has hosted more than 3,000 women at its various events. The 45 current members of the organization’s Council have given more than $120 million to support various needs at OSU, and the combined giving of everyone who attended the Symposium exceeded $147 million. Eight recipients were named Women for OSU scholars: Christina Anaya, an integrative biology doctoral student from Fallbrook, California; Megan DeVuyst, an agribusiness junior from Morrison, Oklahoma; Abbey Grimes, a microbiology sophomore from Bartlesville, Oklahoma; Darci Klein, a counseling psychology doctoral student from St. Louis, Missouri; Wendy Lau Wong, an industrial engineering and management junior from Panama City, Panama, and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Courtney Mapes, an animal science junior from Alva, Oklahoma; Ayrianna Swanson, a French, microbiology and biochemistry sophomore from Oklahoma City; and Karlie Wade, an agricultural communications and pre-law sophomore from Perry, Oklahoma.  There were also two named scholarship awards announced. The Wirt June Newman Memorial Scholarship supports students planning a career in public or government service. It was presented to Krista Boston-Fullerton, an educational leadership and policy studies doctoral student from Stigler, Oklahoma. The Sheryl Benbrook Women for OSU Scholarship is designated for graduate students. This year’s recipient was Sulochana Paudyal, an entomology doctoral student from Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal. The master of ceremonies was alumna and reporter Jocelyn Lockwood. She and Mitchell closed the event by announcing that next year’s 10th annual Symposium, scheduled for April 5, will feature Academy Award-winning actress Octavia Spencer as keynote speaker. It is the highlight of the organization’s year-long celebration of its 10th anniversary. Women for OSU is a diverse group of visionary women who share a passion for inspiring leadership and financial support to OSU. Women for OSU envisions a culture of giving and service that acknowledges the significant impact women have at OSU and inspires others to positively shape the future of the university through philanthropy and engagement. For more information, visit OSUgiving.com/women. PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ostatenews/albums/72157681327107402
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/joan-lunden-keynote-highlights-annual-women-osu-symposium
Thu, 25 May 2017 09:34:40 -0500
Three locals recognized for philanthropy
Women for OSU names Linda Cline Philanthropist of the Year, presents scholarships to Megan DeVuyst and Karlie Wade (l-r)Linda Cline ,Megan DeVuyst, Karlie Wade Morrison native Megan DeVuyst and Perry native Karlie Wade were among 10 recipients at last month’s ninth annual Women for Oklahoma State University Symposium. Linda Cline, owner of Char-Lin Ranch in Cushing, was also recognized as Philanthropist of the Year at the event held inside Gallagher-Iba Arena. DeVuyst is an agribusiness junior, while Wade is an agricultural communications and pre-law sophomore. Both received the scholarship for their extensive work to benefit others. DeVuyst, the daughter of Cheryl and Eric DeVuyst, has a heart for cancer patients. Her mother was diagnosed with stage four of the disease 10 years ago, but beat the odds. Also, her former Sunday school teacher and mentor, Susan Taylor, lost her battle with cancer. So DeVuyst volunteers for organizations such as Coaches vs. Cancer and the Make-A-Wish Foundation. She also credits FFA with helping her mature into a leader and servant. She has spent hundreds of hours with the organization, serving as a state FFA officer, facilitating the Oklahoma FFA Alumni Leadership Camp and the State FFA Convention. She organized a program called Pork for Packs, Beef for Backpacks that led to the donation of more than 355 livestock animals to become more than 500,000 protein sticks for children in food-insecure families. “I definitely think my rural roots led to a heart for service,” DeVuyst said. “Our small town really rallies around causes. That is why I think philanthropy is giving back with your times, gifts and talents to others and putting others before yourself.” Wade, the daughter of Jennie and Connelly Wade, learned a lot about leadership and volunteerism through growing up as an active member of 4-H. She has enriched her understanding of philanthropy by joining the OSU Student Foundation. Now the majority of her service hours are spent giving back through those organizations. Last summer, she was one of 10 young professionals chosen nationally to teach at the Citizenship Washington Focus program at 4-H’s national headquarters in Washington, D.C. She was also a Western National Roundup Facilitator in Denver. At OSU, she has been band chair for the Homecoming Parade and Band Steering committee, raised funds for student organizations through PhilanthroPete, volunteered for Lights on Stillwater and Helping Hands and Meal Plans, and been a member of the National Panhellenic Women’s Fraternity, Freshman Representative Council, President’s Leadership Council and the Sustainability committee. She has also volunteered for Special Olympics, Meals on Wheels, Peppers Ranch Foster Care Community and the Farrah Love Foundation 5K. “With the Student Foundation, we’re literally helping students who, in that moment, say, ‘I can’t be here anymore unless someone helps me now,’” Wade said. “We are having students raise money for other students to stay here. I think that really brings home the Cowboy family because we want everyone here to continue their education. We want everyone to have this Cowboy experience.” Cline, a resident of Cushing since 1967, received the prestigious Philanthropist of the Year award for her support of many needs at OSU and in her community. She memorialized her husband by providing a major gift to name OSU’s state-of-the-art Charles and Linda Cline Equine Teaching Center. It includes a teaching barn with stalls for foaling mares, a small indoor arena, classroom, conference room, feed and tack room, wash rack, treatment area and offices. OSU Extension Services can utilize it to host workshops and learning opportunities for students, 4-H clubs and FFA chapters, as well as the general public. “I think you just get led to do things,” Cline said. “I just do what I think might be helpful and what I want to do. It’s just seeing the need and saying, ‘Is that a place I want to help? Do they need help?’” The Clines bought what they expected to be their retirement property outside Cushing in 1985. They later purchased the 17 horses that established Char-Lin Ranch. The operation peaked at more than 2,500 cattle and 300 horses, earning more than 200 world and reserve world championships before downsizing in recent years.  The Clines did not attend OSU but credited much of Char-Lin Ranch’s success to the university’s faculty visiting the ranch, working with and teaching them, as well as the treatment their animals received at the OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. That led to a long-running relationship with the university’s equine program, which they supported through donations as well as opening their operation to student tours and hiring countless OSU students. They also allowed the Department of Animal Science to use their animals for teaching opportunities, judging team practice, clinics and contests. They even donated several world-class horses to improve the genetics of OSU’s teaching herd and endowed a professorship. In addition to Oklahoma State University, Linda Cline also supports the Right Path Riding Academy; the Special Olympics; Love, I.N.C.; Shiloh Camp; and the American Quarter Horse Association. She is also active in the First United Methodist Church of Cushing. The Symposium was highlighted by a keynote speech from one of the most recognizable women in America, Joan Lunden. The organization awarded 10 scholarships totaling $43,020, which were both records. Also, Linda Cline was recognized as the Philanthropist of the Year at the event that drew 510 attendees. Lunden’s speech discussed her path from being a “weather girl” in Sacramento to anchoring the evening news and eventually 19 years as co-host of Good Morning America. She also talked about her battle with triple negative breast cancer, which was diagnosed in June 2014 and required chemotherapy, surgery and radiation. “When the going gets tough, you can’t quit,” Lunden said. “You have to hang in there and believe you’re going to make it. … Sometimes the most important things we say all day are the things we tell ourselves. ‘Yes, I can do this.’” She also talked about balancing her successful career and private life, including being a mother of seven. She included inspirational messages such as, “We are all writing our life’s story and the pen is in our hands,” and, “You have to be willing to risk not being great for the chance to learn how to do something great.” Amy Mitchell, an alumna and chair of Women for OSU, provided an update on the organization, including some impressive statistics. The group has awarded $187,370 in scholarships to 49 students during its nine-year history. It has hosted more than 3,000 women at its various events. The 45 current members of the organization’s Council have given more than $120 million to support various needs at OSU, and the combined giving of everyone who attended the Symposium exceeded $147 million. Six other recipients joined DeVuyst and Wade as Women for OSU scholars: Christina Anaya, an integrative biology doctoral student from Fallbrook, California; Abbey Grimes, a microbiology sophomore from Bartlesville, Oklahoma; Darci Klein, a counseling psychology doctoral student from St. Louis, Missouri; Wendy Lau Wong, an industrial engineering and management junior from Panama City, Panama, and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Courtney Mapes, an animal science junior from Alva, Oklahoma; and Ayrianna Swanson, a French, microbiology and biochemistry sophomore from Oklahoma City. There were also two named scholarship awards announced. The Wirt June Newman Memorial Scholarship supports students planning a career in public or government service. It was presented to Krista Boston-Fullerton, an educational leadership and policy studies doctoral student from Stigler, Oklahoma. The Sheryl Benbrook Women for OSU Scholarship is designated for graduate students. This year’s recipient was Sulochana Paudyal, an entomology doctoral student from Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal. The master of ceremonies was alumna and reporter Jocelyn Lockwood. She and Mitchell closed the event by announcing that next year’s 10th annual Symposium, scheduled for April 5, will feature Academy Award-winning actress Octavia Spencer as keynote speaker. It is the highlight of the organization’s year-long celebration of its 10th anniversary. Women for OSU is a diverse group of visionary women who share a passion for inspiring leadership and financial support to OSU. Women for OSU envisions a culture of giving and service that acknowledges the significant impact women have at OSU and inspires others to positively shape the future of the university through philanthropy and engagement. For more information, visit OSUgiving.com/women. PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ostatenews/albums/72157681062891034
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/three-locals-recognized-philanthropy
Tue, 23 May 2017 13:41:40 -0500
Oklahoma State recognizes spring 2017 graduates
Oklahoma State University concluded the 135th commencement on its Stillwater campus with four undergraduate ceremonies Saturday at Gallagher-Iba Arena. An estimated 3,600 students earned degrees during six commencement ceremonies Friday and Saturday. In addition to the four undergrad commencements, OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences held its hooding ceremony and the OSU Graduate College recognized more than 650 students for advanced degrees on Friday. Saturday’s undergraduate ceremonies each featured an OSU alumnus as commencement speaker. Larry Bryce, president of Kohler Power Systems, which produces and markets generators and engines on a global basis, spoke to graduates from the College of Human Sciences, and College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology. Dr. Bob L. Blackburn, executive director of the Oklahoma Historical Society, was speaker for the College of Arts and Sciences ceremony. Joseph Eastin, president and CEO of ISN, a global leader in contractor and supplier management systems, and one of the fastest growing privately-owned companies for the past ten years, was the speaker for the Spears School of Business ceremony. Entrepreneur and innovator Piyush Patel, head of Digital Tutors, a leader in online training, spoke to graduates from the College of Education, and the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. During his remarks, Patel announced that he and his wife Lisa had created a scholarship to cover student loans for College of Education graduate and future teacher Danielle Foster. MORE PHOTOS
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/oklahoma-state-recognizes-spring-2017-graduates
Sat, 13 May 2017 19:44:02 -0500
OSU earns national honor for diversity and inclusion, cited as role model
Dr. Jason Kirksey, vice president for the Division of Institutional Diversity and chief diversity officer at Oklahoma State University. Oklahoma State University will be recognized for its diversity and inclusion efforts with the Roosevelt Thomas Champion of Diversity Award on June 8 in Scottsdale, Arizona. The honor is awarded annually by the American Association for Access, Equity and Diversity (AAAED), a national, nonprofit organization of equal opportunity, diversity and affirmative action professionals. “This award is a special acknowledgement of OSU’s outstanding achievements in promoting diversity in the workforce,” said Myron R. Anderson, president of AAAED.  “You are indeed a role model for all of us as we seek to promote access, equity and diversity among equal opportunity and diversity professions and in civil rights in general.” In selecting OSU for the award, AAAED noted the university continues to emerge as a nationally-recognized leader in diversity and inclusion, and is establishing a standard for its future advancement.  “We are honored and extremely humbled to have earned another nationally-prestigious award, which affirms our work to facilitate a culture of inclusion that provides new opportunities for our students, faculty, and staff to achieve advancements in their pursuit of excellence,” said Dr. Jason F. Kirksey, vice president for the Division of Institutional Diversity and chief diversity officer at OSU. “It is especially gratifying to know that, as a university system, diversity and inclusion is the expectation, rather than the exception at OSU.” In the past year, OSU has received the 2016 National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE) Institutional Excellence Award, the 2016 Southwest Minority Supplier Development Council Corporation of the Year Award, the 2016 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from Insight Into Diversity magazine, the 2016 Minority Access, Inc. Institution Committed to Diversity Award, the 2016 Mosaic Five-star Inclusive Workplace Culture Award from the Tulsa Chamber of Commerce’s diversity business council, the NADOHE 2017 Dr. Frank W. Hale, Jr. Distinguished Service Award, and last fall earned the designation of a Purple Heart University. Additionally, OSU is one of eighteen schools in the nation to have received the HEED Award five consecutive years, and is ranked in the 25th Annual Top 100 Degree Producers edition of Diverse Issues in Higher Education for the number of African American, American Indian, Asian American, and Latino graduates across multiple degree fields. “As appreciative as we are for the recognition and accolades, we know that OSU is a special place because many or our most significant diversity and inclusion efforts are rarely recorded in reports or award nominations,” said Kirksey. “It is exciting to recognize all that OSU has achieved under the leadership of President Burns Hargis and the Division of Institutional Diversity, and everyone affiliated with the university should be proud of our reputation and commitment. However, we also understand and acknowledge much work remains to sustain and build on that commitment and accomplish OSU’s goals toward inclusive excellence.” Kirksey will travel to Scottsdale, Arizona to receive the award, on behalf of the university, during the AAAED Annual Awards program and 43rd National Conference.  AAAED members include individuals and organizations from the public and private sectors, business, social services, law, government and academic institutions. Nearly one-half work for institutions of higher education. For more information, go to: www.aaaed.org.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-earns-national-honor-diversity-and-inclusion-cited-role-model
Thu, 11 May 2017 09:26:06 -0500
OSU to host Oklahoma high school students and teachers for National Lab Day
For the eighth year, more than 100 students from across the state will be on the Oklahoma State University campus in Stillwater for National Lab Day. The day will give students and teachers a chance to work with 90 STEM professionals (OSU scientists, engineers and mathematicians) on discovery-based science experiments including Mars and lunar habitat stimulation, extracting and isolation DNA, robot demonstrations, energy harvesting and fire behavior experiments.  WHEN:  Tuesday, May 16, 8 a.m. – 2:45 p.m. WHERE: Various labs across the OSU Stillwater campus Participating Schools: Guthrie High School, Morrison High School, Cache High School, Stillwater High School, Central Technology Center, Tishomingo High School, Deer Creek High School, Gordon Cooper Technology Center, Eagle Point Christian Academy, Cushing High School, Bartlesville High School, Mannford High School and Dewey High School.  For more information contact Christy Lang with the OSU College of Education. 
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-host-oklahoma-high-school-students-and-teachers-national-lab-day
Wed, 10 May 2017 09:44:14 -0500
‘Outstanding’ student researchers recognized with NSF fellowships
(l-r) Christian Ley,Ashley Rankin,Ann Money The National Science Foundation has awarded three Oklahoma State University students Graduate Research Fellowships in a program that drew proposals from 13,000 students from across the U.S. this year. The highly-competitive annual NSF program offers significant financially support by choosing 2,000 student scientists, engineers and others who have “potential for significant research achievement.” OSU recipients include: Christian Ley, from Broken Arrow, received a fellowship with her first proposal, a rare achievement for undergraduate applicants. She graduates this spring from OSU with a B.S. in biosystems and agricultural engineering and is entering an environmental science doctoral program at Purdue University. She will examine the safety of municipal water systems and work to develop bio-sensors for water-borne pathogens. Ann Money is the curator of education and research at the Oklahoma Aquarium in Jenks. She returned to school to earn a doctorate in integrative biology at OSU where she is conducting research into the health of coral systems and possible explanations for the hardiness and survival of certain coral species affected by worldwide coral bleaching. Money is from Alexandria, Virginia. Ashley Rankin, from Belton, Texas, earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from North Texas University. She joined an OSU doctoral psychology program and is researching the psycho-biology of close friendships and how hormone levels affect friendship quality. Honorable mention: Scott Goeppner, from Bridgewater, Mass., was recognized with an honorable mention for his integrative biology doctoral research at OSU. “I’m very honored. Out of thousands of overqualified applicants, the NSF saw value in me personally as a researcher and in my research,” Rankin said. “I think my research is extremely important but for an organization like the NSF to agree – I just feel very proud that my research can shine through.” “The goal of NSF Graduate Research Fellowships is ‘recruiting and supporting outstanding students with high potential in science, technology, engineering and mathematics very early in their graduate training,’” said Jim Lewis, NSF acting assistant director for Education and Human Resources. Recipients receive a $34,000 annual stipend while the graduate institution receives a $12,000 cost-of-education allowance. The NSF funds each fellowship for three years, which can be used over a five-year period. “The financial support from the NSF fellowship is definitely going to make my doctoral venture less stressful,” Ley said. PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ostatenews/albums/72157683529084286
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/outstanding-student-researchers-recognized-nsf-fellowships
Thu, 11 May 2017 09:22:51 -0500
OSU student grows through internship
Jordan Richards in his ULAE workspace Making the move from Stillwater to a big city can be daunting, but one Oklahoma State University student decided to make the leap this semester. Jordan Richards, a graphic design senior from Flower Mound, Texas, has spent the spring semester interning with Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE) outside New York City. ULAE is a fine art print publisher, and Richards spends his days learning the processes of printmaking and helping out around the ULAE studio. ULAE offers a unique internship opportunity to three OSU art students each year for the spring, fall, and summer. The program was developed by Bill Goldston, president of ULAE and an OSU alumnus. Goldston focuses on creating a well-rounded experience for interns. “The internship is what they want it to be,” Goldston said. “I want my interns to be able to tell other students what they learned in New York and the experiences they had. I want them to be able to share the experience – not just go back and graduate.” Richards, although intrigued by the internship, didn’t initially plan to accept the offer. “I was so scared at first I actually wasn’t going to go,” Richards said. “But I thought if I’m scared, then that should be the reason I go for it. I needed to get out of my comfort zone and take a leap of faith. I’m so happy I did because the opportunities ULAE has given me in my time here have taught me so much.” Richards’ experience has allowed him to learn from ULAE printers as they work with notable artists and produce prints. He has also learned how to make paper from scratch. He recently utilized his graphic design skills to design a website for the ULAE gallery. More important than a new skill set, Richards has gained a new sense of confidence through his time in New York. “ULAE has given me the opportunity to explore New York City every weekend, and I have learned so much from it,” Richards said. “It has definitely taught me to be more confident in myself, my designs and in the dreams I want to chase. Someone once told me that I need to be unapologetic of who I am and the dreams I want, and I think that this experience has instilled that in me.” Richards said being thrown into a foreign environment pushed him to grow in ways he wouldn’t have in the comfort of Stillwater. He encourages other students to push themselves in similar ways. “I know it might sound cliché, but life is too short to remain comfortable,” Richards said. “You must chase after the things you want because if you didn’t, you’ll look back at missed opportunities with regret. I know I’ve learned so much through this experience, and I will carry it with me for the rest of my life and into any new opportunity.” Story by Catherine Wilson PHOTOS: https://flic.kr/s/aHskUYb8Rq
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-student-grows-through-internship
Tue, 09 May 2017 15:08:08 -0500
OSU Advertising Students Claim Victory
A group of Oklahoma State University undergraduate students placed first at the 10th District National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC), and have advanced through semi-finals to the national finals. “This is only the second time in nearly 30 years that OSU has made it to nationals, so I could not be more proud of them,” said Dr. Cynthia Nichols, associate professor for the OSU School of Media and Strategic Communications.  “The NSAC team competed against some incredible schools, but the judges told me that Oklahoma State’s book was the obvious winner at Districts. Their tireless work paid off.” The competition is organized by the American Advertising Federation (AAF) and involves more than 3,000 students from across the country. The top eight campaigns will compete for the national title at the AAF’s national conference, ADMERICA, held June 8-10 in New Orleans. “They worked countless hours and came up with a brilliant plan,” Nichols said. “But now we need help getting to New Orleans. This is only the second time OSU has made it to nationals, and we need the help of our alumni and friends to get us there.” Beginning May 5, the NSAC team will be raising funds for this trip through PhilanthroPete, the OSU crowdfunding website. The club aims to raise $10,000 to cover travel and expenses for the trip, as well as give future teams a head start on their own fundraising. Individuals wanting to help the NSAC team reach nationals can go to https://philanthropete.osugiving.com/project/3544. Now in its 44th year, the NSAC gives students an opportunity to create a marketing campaign in response to a real-world case study. This year the AAF partnered with sponsor Ajinomoto Windsor, Inc. (AWI).  Students conducted research and developed campaigns for AWI’s Tai Pei Frozen Entrees and Appetizers.  OSU’s team was advised by Nichols and Dr. Jami Fullerton, professor and Endowed Research Chair for the OSU School of Media and Strategic Communication.  The students involved include:   Oklahoma Ardmore Maddy Oaks Broken Arrow Andrew Burnett Edmond Michelle MacLean Elgin Tiffany Gebhart Guthrie Mallory Fulks Lakewood Ranch Maddie Duffy Muskogee Jeffrey Grey Denton Norman Rylie Carter Oklahoma City Brandon Havens Texhoma Ann E. Freeman Tulsa Sydnie Hill Leanna Smith Adriana Ware   Illinois Aurora Tom Carlson   Kansas Leawood Paige Hess   Maryland Towson Kendall Treece   Minnesota Cottonwood Chelsey Johnson   Texas Arlington Sara Rothschild Canadian Allie Collier Flower Mound Jessi Brandt Richardson K.J. Leu Jessica Wedge San Antonio Alexis Gliedt The Colony Devon Post   PHOTO: https://flic.kr/s/aHskUbYzMu
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-advertising-students-claim-victory
Wed, 10 May 2017 12:14:37 -0500

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