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OSU economist among hall of fame inductees
When it comes to straight talk about Oklahoma's economy, colleagues and reporters alike have rave reviews for Dr. Larkin Warner, economist and Regents professor emeritus at Oklahoma State University. They say it comes as no surprise that Warner is among those who were inducted into the Oklahoma Higher Education Hall of Fame October 18th during ceremonies at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City.One of Warner’s colleagues at OSU, Dr. Jerry Lage calls him a true professional. “Larkin always managed to draw practical insights from economic data that he could share with others and that’s what makes that data so valuable in the first place,” says Lage, who adds that he was struck by Warner’s thoroughness, organization, disciplined thinking and logic. Warner worked for OSU for 33 years and his economic-savvy brought a lot of attention to the university. He is mainly noted for his research that emphasized practical issues in public finance, education and transportation in Oklahoma. “Larkin has been a tremendous asset to the state when it comes to our policy on expenditures. He worked on a project with the Kerr Foundation for years that actually tracked state expenditures and their functions and services. He knows how to interpret his findings and convert them into budgetary policy recommendations that can help the state develop over the long-term,” says Lage. Former KOSU news reporter Paul Sund, who now serves as Governor Brad Henry’s communications director, says he remembers well his many interviews with Warner. “I knew I could trust Larkin as someone who could explain Oklahoma’s economic situation in a way that all of us could understand. It was a pure pleasure to be assigned to talk to him.”  As good as he is as an economist and communicator, ask Warner himself about the task he has prized most over the years and his answer might surprise you: “I have always appreciated access to the Edmon Low Library (OSU). This is truly the university’s major academic asset. I particularly value my recollections of Edmon Low himself. I was chair of the Faculty Council’s Library Committee the last year that Mr. Low was head librarian—sometime in the mid-1960s.” Warner’s own collection of research is available for use at the library. As for his hall of fame honor, Warner insists it’s really the result of “being in the right institutional setting with colleagues and administrators who shared my commitment to research and public service for economic development in Oklahoma.” “It is amazing that three of these individuals, all of whom are retired members of the Department of Economics and Legal Studies in business at OSU, have preceded me as hall of fame honorees—Richard Poole, Richard Leftwich and Robert Sandmeyer.”  
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-economist-among-hall-fame-inductees
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
Mitchell joins higher-ed stalwarts in hall of fame
When describing his 38-year legacy at Oklahoma State University, 2005 Oklahoma Higher Education Hall of Fame inductee Dr. Earl D. Mitchell Jr. recalls a story about the 19 th century biologist and chemist Louis Pasteur. Reputedly, the man who said, “Chance favors the prepared mind,” was blessed by good fortune in his discovery of chirality. “Pasteur went on to discover many, many things, but as a doctoral student, he demonstrated that organic molecules exist in right-handed and left-handed forms by comparing crystals of tartaric acid,” Mitchell said. “We now know that had he not been in Paris at that time of year, with perfect environmental conditions, he would not have achieved the crystallization.” “Without any kind of climate control, what Pasteur did would have been impossible just about anywhere else in the world,” he said. “Sometimes, doing things is all about being in the right place at the right time.” OSU has been the right place for Mitchell since 1967 when, as a postdoctoral student, he joined Dr. George Waller’s research team in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology department. The state’s university had recently become the first in the United States to possess a gas chromatograph mass-spectrometer, setting the stage for groundbreaking research. The group’s work led to numerous publications, including a 1969 Science magazine cover story on feline metabolism, as well as productive collaborations. Years later, when the Nixon administration launched a federal initiative to fund meriting agricultural research programs at historically black colleges and universities, Mitchell co-wrote Langston University’s successful proposal with Dr. Steve Latimer, a colleague of Waller’s at the school. The mass-spectrometer is now an artifact in the Smithsonian Institute, and many of Mitchell’s early collaborators have moved on, but in each of his subsequent capacities – as a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, assistant dean of OSU’s Graduate College and associate vice president for Multicultural Affairs – he has sought to create opportunities for others. Since it was established in 1994, Mitchell has served as the Oklahoma director for the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation. The National Science Foundation-funded program seeks to increase the number of students pursuing science, mathematics, engineering and technology degrees with scholarship support, summer internships and research opportunities. “When we started in 1994, 214 Hispanic, African-American, Native American and Pacific Islander students received baccalaureate degrees at state schools, and the number is now around 720,” Mitchell said. “And Oklahoma now produces approximately one-third of all Native Americans graduating nationwide each year with four-year degrees in science, math, engineering and technology fields.” Mitchell has also had an impact on the supply of exceptional student prospects at colleges and universities in the state. “I knew Frank Harbin, a state legislator from McAlester, from my time on the state Merit Protection Commission, and Dan Draper, who was Speaker of the House, was my neighbor here in Stillwater,” Mitchell said. “I also visited Penny Williams, the state representative from Tulsa, and Sen. Bernice Shedrick here in Stillwater, and it just solidified something they’d been thinking about.” “They [Williams and Shedrick] took the ball and ran with it and authored the bill that established the Oklahoma School of Science and Math,” he said. According to Shedrick, an attorney in Stillwater, Mitchell brought to the endeavor his unparalleled ability to inspire others with ideas. “Dr. Mitchell approached Sen. Williams and me with this vision of creating a math and science high school for the state of Oklahoma,” Shedrick said. “It’s one thing to put your ideas out there, and it’s another to bring people along with you, but he brought his expertise to the table with detailed research showing us how this type of specialized instruction would be a major investment in the young people of our state. “Today, OSOM sets the standard nationwide with its comprehensive education and ranks among the top in the nation in students’ scores on college entrance exams,” she said. The Oklahoma Higher Education Hall of Fame Induction is perhaps the ultimate accolade for OSU’s first tenured African-American faculty member. And although he speaks of retiring in the not too distant future to spend more time with his wife, Bernice, and their children and grandchildren, Mitchell will not be relenting in his quiet efforts behind the scenes. A noted civil rights proponent, Mitchell is also active in the United Methodist Church as well as the Democratic Party, including serving as a delegate to the National Convention last year. “The world would work a lot better if no one was concerned about who gets credit,” Mitchell said. “My attitude has always been about getting the right people together to get things done. “When we’re not worried about who gets credit, people can do a lot.”
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/mitchell-joins-higher-ed-stalwarts-hall-fame
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
OSU Wheelchair Basketball Player climbs wall at the Colvin
Fred Jones (left), climbing wall attendant at Oklahoma State University’s Colvin Recreation Center, adjust a rope in preparation for Anthony Meadows (right) to climb the state-of-art climbing wall at the Colvin Recreation Center.  Meadows, an OSU student and member of the OSU wheelchair basketball team, climbed the wall on Wednesday during OSU’s Disability Awareness Week.  For more information about the climbing wall, call Outdoor Adventure at 744-5581. For information about services offered by OSU’s Student Disability Services call 744-7116.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-wheelchair-basketball-player-climbs-wall-colvin
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
CEAT Presents Halliburton Faculty Honors
Professors who advanced wireless communications and tissue regeneration as engineering curriculum and research emphases at Oklahoma State University have been presented the 2005 Halliburton Faculty Excellence Awards. Sundar Madihally and Jong-Moon Chung joined Camille DeYong and Mark Pruitt as this year’s recipients of the awards that acknowledge extraordinary contributions in instruction, outreach and research in OSU’s College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology. Initially named during May commencement, honorees formally receive a plaque and a stipend during the college’s annual, fall faculty meeting. The Excellent Teacher and Excellent Young Teacher are selected by a group of student and faculty representatives. A peer committee determines the Outstanding Faculty Member and Outstanding Young Faculty Member, recognitions for distinction beyond the classroom. Honorees in both categories, however, excel in all facets of instruction, research, mentoring and professional and volunteer service, according to David Thompson, CEAT associate dean for instruction. Chung, the Outstanding Young Faculty Member Award recipient, is an associate professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. In addition to creating new courses to bolster the school’s wireless communications curriculum, he founded its Advanced Communications System Engineering Laboratory and the Oklahoma Communication Laboratory for Networking and Bioengineering . Since he joined the faculty in 1999, Chung has helped secure more than $2.5 million in research funding, including competitive contracts to develop a wireless communications badge for U.S. Navy sailors with Nomadics Inc. engineers. His honors include recently being named a 2005 Regents Distinguished Research Award winner. In less than three years at OSU, Madihally has taught six different courses including chemical reactor design, unit operations and introduction to biomedical engineering. The Excellent Young Teacher Award- and 2005 President’s Leadership Award winner advises two OSU student organizations, including a dynamic Indian Student Association and an American Institute of Chemical Engineers student chapter that perennially ranks among the ten best in the nation. This past April, OSU chapter members placed first, second and third among teams vying to represent AIChE’s Mid-American Region in the National Chem-E Car Competition. Since only the top three Mid-American teams are sent the finals, OSU’s unprecedented success under Madihally has compelled contest organizers to reevaluate national qualifying. In the laboratory, the assistant professor in the School of Chemical Engineering is developing new bioengineering techniques to grow heart valves, blood vessels and other tissues from umbilical stem cells. Pruitt, an associate professor in the Construction Management Technology department, received the Outstanding Faculty Award. Students acknowledge not only the rigor of the courses he instructs but also his use of the latest technologies to teach about contract documents, computer aided drafting, computer estimating, construction law and timber and form design. Pruitt has coached construction management scholars to numerous regional titles in design/build competitions against their peers from other schools. Since he joined the faculty in 1992, he has also overseen students’ construction of the CMT department’s laboratory building in the entrepreneurial engineering park northwest of campus. Pruitt holds advanced degrees in both architecture and construction management and enjoys high demand in the private sector as a professional consultant. DeYong, who received the Excellent Teacher Award, instructs five different courses in quality management and engineering ergonomics, continuing the quality tradition established in the oldest industrial engineering and management program west of the Mississippi River. The associate professor’s honors for teaching include the Advancia Excellence in Distance Learning Award and repeat Outstanding Instructor ratings by National Technological University students. Outside the classroom, DeYong helped spearhead the reinstatement at OSU of the Reaching Engineering and Architecture Career Heights (REACH) program, a summer academy in which young women are introduced to careers in high tech fields. The 2003 President’s Service Award recipient has also served as faculty advisor for students in the Institute of Industrial Engineers at OSU and in the region. DeYong holds the rank of senior judge for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Awards, the standard in organizational and business honors for customer satisfaction and performance excellence. She also serves as faculty coordinator of the Aging Systems Sustainment and Enabling Technologies (ASSET) program, the government-academic-business partnership initiated at OSU to address Department of Defense procurement problems. The Halliburton Awards program is the keystone of the relationship between Halliburton and the CEAT that dates to 1960 when, still headquartered in Duncan, the company began to fund laboratory development and research on the OSU-Stillwater campus, according to Dr. Karl Reid, dean of the college. The faculty recognition program at OSU is the oldest in the nation actively supported by the Halliburton Foundation.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/ceat-presents-halliburton-faculty-honors
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
"Déjà vu at OSU
By Courtney Hentges For Christina Stallings and her son Brendan it’s “déjà vu" at OSU. Christina, an Oklahoma Department of Agriculture Food and Forestry educator, is back on campus after more than 20 years—at the same time that Brendan is working on his degree. "I always hoped I would go back to school, but being on campus with one of my kids takes a little getting used to,” says Christina, now in her second year at OSU.  “It is pretty cool though, sitting in the Hideaway with my son talking about the good old days." After graduating from OSU with a bachelor’s degree in zoology in 1983, Christina always knew she wanted to return for graduate school.  However, between work and raising three children she never found the time.  Following her husband's death in 2004, she decided it was time to fulfill her dream.  She applied for admission in the Environmental Science Masters program at OSU. Brendan was a senior at Putnam High School and was applying to college at the same time.  Both Christina and Brendan received acceptance letters from OSU on the same day.  Brendan remembers thinking out loud, "That's great!  I finally get to go away to college and my mom goes with me!" In reality, Brendan, a theater sophomore, says having his mom around isn't that bad, although seeing her on campus for the first time was shocking. Being back at OSU triggers memories for Christina.  The campus is the same, but the people and student attitudes are completely different. During her undergraduate years, the United States was in the middle of the Iranian hostage crisis, the Cold War was on everyone's minds and students were staging demonstrations on campus.  She says it was a completely different time, and her memories and current experiences don't always match up. "To put things in perspective, when I was a freshman in 1978 the Vietnam War had only been over for a few years, the U.S. had just celebrated its Bicentennial and ‘Space Invaders’ was all the rage,” Christina says. “Oh, and the Strip still had Streakers Night!" Despite warnings and doubts from some of her friends, Christina says she's really enjoying being back in class and has had great instructors. Brendan admits he likes it too. Best of all, they are both on track to graduate together with the class of 2008. "Wouldn't it be great if we could walk across the graduation stage together?" Christina says.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/d-j-vu-osu
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
FALL CONVOCATION
Celebrate Great Awards Preston Hunter, OSU Student Eric Ogburn, OSU-OKC Student   PhoenixAward for Graduate FacultyThis GPSGA award honors an outstanding graduate faculty member who embodies the character of leadership, scholarship, and university and community service and involvement with graduate and/or professional students.   Manjunath Kamath, Professor, Industrial Engineering Regents Distinguished Teaching Award This award recognizes faculty who have evidenced unusually signficant achievement for an extended period of years. Winners receive a $1,000 permanent stipend. Shelly Sitton , Associate Professor, Agricultural Education, Communications, and 4-H Youth Development Melanie C. Page, Associate Professor, Psychology Zane Quible, Professor, Management Kathryn Castle, Professor, Teaching and Curriculum Leadership Andrew Arena, Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Jerrold K. Leong, Associate Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Administration James Meinkoth, Veterinary Pathobiology Regents Distinguished Research AwardThis award recognizes faculty who have evidenced unusually significant achievement in their field of research. Awardees receive a $1,000 permanent stipiend. Carol Bender, Regents Professor, Entomology and Plant Pathology Ziad El-Rassi, Professor, Chemistry Xincheng Xie, Regents Professor, Physics Debra Nelson, Professor and SSB Associates Professor, Management Bert Jacobson, Professor and Head, Educational StudiesHailin Qu, Professor and William E. Davis Chair, Hotel and Restaurant Administration Carey N.  Pope, Professor and Endowed Chair, Physiological SciencesJong-Moon Chung, Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering Merrick Foundation Teaching Award This award with a $1,500 stipend, is presented to a faculty member who is judged to bring his/her students a better understanding and appreciation of the American economic system.                 William B. Elliott, Assistant Professor, Finance   Sigma XI Lectureship Award This Scientific Research Society award, with a $1,500 stipend, recognizes scientific excellence and is considered the highest honor of its field.                         Charles I. Abramson, Professor, Psychology   Outreach Faculty Excellence Award Winners must be full-time faculty and active participants in University Outreach activities. The awardee receives $1,000.               Blayne Mayfield, Associate Professor, Computer Science   International Faculty Excellence AwardWinners are faculty members who have distinguished themselves by integrating an international perspective into teaching, research, and/or outreach. The award consists of a $1,000 stipend.               Thomas Kuzmic, Professor, Forestry   Newly Appointed Regents Professors               James Huston, History                                 Satya Nandi, Physics                   Don Lucca, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering                                 Donna Branson, Design, Housing and Merchandising   OSU Award of Excellence for AdvisementThis award provides institutional recognition of nominees for outstanding advising.                         Robert Kropp, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Sciences                                 Larry Claypool, College of Arts and Sciences                   Joe Rackley, College of Arts and Sciences                   Jeretta Nord, Spears School of Business                   Cathy Orsack, College of Education                   Mohammed Bilbeisi, College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology                   Bill Ryan, College of Human Environmental Sciences    President Service AwardGiven to faculty, staff, and administrators, this award is selected by the President for meritorious service to the University.   Brenda Masters, Director of University Accreditation   Andy Maxey, Manager with the Institute for Teaching and Learning Excellence   Kyle Wray, Director of Marketing Services                                                                                                                           Eminent Faculty AwardAn annual award of $10,000 which is given to a faculty member who has made sustained contributions to scholarly-creative activity, teaching, and service.               Dr. Marvin Stone, Regents Professor, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.   Loyal and True AwardThis award is presented to individuals who personify the spirit of OSU through their unwavering devotion, personal sacrifice and commitment of time and talents, well above and beyond what is expected.   Danny Stith, First President of the OSU Parents Association
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/fall-convocation
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
OSU conference spotlights vet-med advancements
The expansion and enhancement of the national identification system for food animals, including its implementation in the state, are among current developments in veterinary medicine that will be highlighted next week at Oklahoma State University. The OSU College of Veterinary Medicine Fall Veterinary Conference will be held October 6 – 7 at the Wes Watkins Center on the Stillwater campus. The event welcomes veterinary doctors and technicians from Oklahoma and throughout the nation, according to Dr. Michael Lorenz, dean and professor at OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. “The conference primarily serves to provide quality, continuing education for practicing veterinarians in Oklahoma,” Lorenz said. “We bring in board certified, distinguished individuals from across the country to lead sessions and help ensure that, in transferring knowledge to the profession, we provide the most practical, relevant program we can for our constituents.” “The conference also doubles as the College of Veterinary Medicine homecoming so it’s our pleasure to welcome back to campus our alumni from all corners of the world,” Lorenz said. Concerns about agriterrorism and, to a much greater extent, infectious diseases such as mad cow disease have led to the utilization of computer microchips to track cattle, according to Dr. Carolyn MacAllister, CVHS coordinator of continuing education. “Animal identification systems are a fairly new development but are rapidly becoming mandatory,” MacAllister said. “The idea is to know where cattle are and have been ‘from birth to the plate’ as a way to protect our food supply.” “Sessions of the conference will provide an overview for veterinarians of what to expect from the system and how it will be used in the event of, for instance, a Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy scare or an agriterror attack,” she said. Dr. Becky Brewer, state veterinarian, and Dr. Scott Dewald on Friday will describe the implementation of the national animal identification system in Oklahoma. Other presentations will focus on technologies behind the system and their optimization. “Because microprocessors are implanted into animals, the system has a number of cattle management applications,” MacAllister said. “A session will involve the system’s use in health monitoring and how practitioners may use various kinds of software to assist their customers and clients.” In addition to the food animal symposiums, the conference includes sessions on medical breakthroughs in the care and treatment of equine and small animals. Highlights include new developments in the neonatal care of foals, the management of skin ailments for dogs and the diagnosis of respiratory disease in dogs and cats. Following education sessions Thursday morning, Dr. Stephen Sundlof, director of the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, will give the conference keynote speech at 11:30 a.m. Sundlof will detail his agency’s approval and regulation of drugs used in veterinary medicine. His appearance is sponsored by the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine Class of 1963. The 2005 Fall Veterinary Conference is a presentation of OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, its Alumni Affairs and College Outreach offices and the Department of Veterinary Technology at OSU-OKC.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-conference-spotlights-vet-med-advancements
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
Helmerich Family Pledges $9 Million For OSU-Tulsa's Research and Technology Center
TULSA – Oklahoma State University announced today that Walter and Peggy Helmerich and The Helmerich Foundation are pledging $9 million to OSU-Tulsa’s first research and technology development center, which will be named the Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center. “This is a monumental gift and a substantial boost to our vision of building a center that will be a state and national model for academic and economic stimulation through innovative university-industry collaboration,” said OSU System CEO and President David J. Schmidly. “We are extremely proud that our new Advanced Technology Research Center now bears the Helmerich name. “The Helmerich gift, along with the commitment of the people of Tulsa through VISION 2025 and the state bond issue, will allow us to create a facility that will attract world-class faculty and propel OSU-Tulsa to new levels of achievement,” Schmidly said. Walter Helmerich said, “This is a unique opportunity for our family and our foundation to support research and technology development that can truly make a difference here at home and around the world. There is exciting potential to leverage the fundamental research conducted at OSU-Tulsa’s new center into commercially successful enterprises. The ATRC will make a lasting impact on the Tulsa economy.” OSU-Tulsa will begin construction on the 123,000-square foot Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center in October and hopes to open the center in the fall of 2007. The city of Tulsa committed $30 million through its 2025 initiative and then the state committed $12.9 million through its higher education capital bond issue to make the center a reality. “We are truly grateful to the people of Tulsa and the state for their commitment to this state-of-the art center,” said Gary Trennepohl, president of OSU-Tulsa. “This gift from The Helmerich Foundation gives us the ability to completely outfit all laboratories with the latest scientific equipment needed to reach the center’s full potential. The Helmerich ATRC launches an important new chapter in the life of OSU-Tulsa.” Karl Reid, dean of the OSU College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology, is equally excited about what the Helmerich ATRC will mean to the Tulsa region and to Oklahoma. “Our vision for the Helmerich ATRC is that it will be a national model for economic stimulation through university research and technology development. “The center will have a huge impact on our ability to attract faculty who are competitive with the best, to prepare our graduates to be intellectual leaders in technology-based organizations, and to make a difference in new enterprise development,” Reid said. When fully operational, Trennepohl said he expects the center to house 40 faculty and 100 graduate students with a payroll of $8.5-to-$10 million. The $9 million Helmerich gift, which will be paid over five years, will help pay construction costs and for the purchase of state-of-the-art equipment for the center’s core and thrust laboratories. The Helmerich ATRC will focus on four strategic research and technology development thrusts that are part of the fabric and the future of the Tulsa region – materials science and engineering, bio-based technologies, energy technologies, and information and control technologies. Across these four areas, the ATRC will focus on development of advanced materials that are derived from the application of nanotechnology to biological and biomedical materials, ceramics, composites, sensors, aerospace materials, polymers, and metals. “It is the scope of work and what it can mean to energy, aerospace and other industries in our region and our state that is truly exciting,” Helmerich said. The Helmerich Foundation was created in 1965 by Walter Helmerich and his father. The Helmerichs have been valuable supporters of OSU. Mr. Helmerich was a leader in the campaign to renovate OSU’s historic Gallagher-Iba Arena and Mrs. Helmerich has been an influential supporter of the OSU Centennial Commission and the Friends of OSU Edmon Low Library.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/helmerich-family-pledges-9-million-osu-tulsas-research-and-technology-center
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
OSU Alumnus Restores His Place in the Heart
TULSA – Tulsa resident and long-time Oklahoma State University supporter John Clerico and his late wife, Beverly had a special place in their hearts at OSU. As students, they met, fell in love and spent many hours walking through OSU’s beautiful campus. When Mrs. Clerico passed away last year, her husband decided to honor her memory by restoring their favorite place, the plaza in front of the Edmon Low Library. Thanks to Clerico’s generous gift of $500,000, the plaza looks new again and is a great improvement over the original, which had never been renovated. It now features a brick-like stamped concrete finish with a non-skid surface that is much safer for walking during wet or icy weather. The centerpiece will be a large etching of the university’s official seal on the plaza surface. Plaques honoring Mrs. Clerico will be at the south entrances, and the area will be known for all time as the Beverly Clerico Plaza. A dedication ceremony is scheduled at 10 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 1, and the public is invited. The Clericos’ daughter, Diane Clerico Deakin, of Newtown, Conn. is scheduled to attend the event. “When Beverly and I first met, we had a couple of classes together in the Classroom Building, so she and I went across that plaza every day for a semester,” Clerico said. “We were just getting to know each other. It was a very formative time in our relationship, and we had many, many fond memories of that area and those times. “I know Beverly would have appreciated this opportunity to beautify the campus she loved and which played such a meaningful part in our life together. Our family is proud to know that her name will forever be a part of our alma mater.” Clerico said the plaza is just one landmark that needs restoration, and he’s hoping other donors will come forward to enhance the beauty of the OSU campus. “For someone who’s been away as long as me, it’s clear that some of our campus landmarks are at risk,” Clerico said. “The major reason is the decline in state support for the university, and the only way to solve this problem is with private donations. It’s up to those of us who enjoyed this campus and benefited from a wonderful education to give back for students of today and those in the future.” OSU System CEO and President David Schmidly agrees that gifts from valued donors such as the Clericos are more important than ever as state support continues to decline. “The funds we receive from the state, which 20 years ago were close to half of our total budget, are less than a third today. Donor gifts are critical to the future health of OSU,” he said. “We are deeply grateful to the Clericos for their long-time support of OSU and for this gift. Beverly loved OSU, and we're honored to recognize her with this lasting tribute. OSU has a special place in its heart for the Clerico family.” The Clericos’ support of the university has been ongoing for more than two decades. Clerico is chairman and a registered financial adviser at ChartMark Investments, Inc., in Tulsa, which he co-founded in 2000. He serves on the board of directors of Community Health Systems, Inc., headquartered in Brentwood, Tenn., which operates more than 70 hospitals in more than 20 states. From 1983-92, he was an executive officer in various financial and accounting areas of Union Carbide Corporation, and when Praxair, Inc., was spun-off in 1992, he served as its executive vice president and the chief financial officer and a director until 2000.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/osu-alumnus-restores-his-place-heart
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500
Famed Sports Writer, Frank Deford Featured at Library Fundraiser
Frank Deford is well recognized in virtually every medium. This versatile writer has published fourteen books, is a senior writer at Sports Illustrated, a commentator on NPR’s Morning Edition, and a regular commentator on HBO’s Real Sports. He is also the featured speaker for the H. Louise & H.E. “Ed” Cobb Speaker Series on November 4. The event is an annual fundraiser for the OSU-Stillwater Library System.    Chad Haney, Director of Library Development said, “This event is made possible every year through the generosity of the Cobb family. In 1994, Mr. Cobb and his three children established an endowment to fund a speaker for the Friends of the OSU Library banquet. The family’s continued support has ensured our ongoing success. This year we are also grateful to our corporate sponsor Stillwater National Bank.”    The event includes a welcome reception at 6 pm and dinner in the library’s Peggy V. Helmerich Browsing Room at 6:30 pm. After dinner, Deford will speak and take questions from the audience. A signing reception will follow. This will be the only opportunity to hear and meet Deford during his visit to Stillwater. Golden Circle Sponsors of the event, as well as those donating to the Library at a certain level will be invited to an exclusive pre-event with Frank Deford. Those interested should contact Haney at 405-744-6323 for more information.    Seating is limited and reservations must be made by October 26. Individual tickets are $75, and half the cost is tax-deductible. One can sponsor the attendance of an OSU student for $75. Full cost of student-sponsored tickets is tax-deductible.    A table for eight can be sponsored for $750. This sponsorship level includes a complimentary signed copy of Everybody’s All-American and recognition in the program; $450 is tax-deductible. Golden Circle Sponsorships are $1500. This sponsorship level includes admission to the exclusive pre-event with Deford, premium seating for eight, a complimentary signed copy of Everybody’s All-American and The Old Ball Game, recognition in the program and publicity releases; $1200 is tax-deductible.    According to Haney, “The event was originally publicized to feature author Frank McCourt. Due to unexpected circumstances that engagement had to be canceled. We are very pleased to be able to offer another author of such a high caliber. Deford is a great speaker and he’s excited about visiting OSU. I’m sure our guests will be very happy with this year’s event.”    For more details or to request invitations, call (405) 744-7331, email lib-pub@okstate.edu, or visit www.library.okstate.edu/friends.
https://news.okstate.edu/articles/famed-sports-writer-frank-deford-featured-library-fundraiser
Mon, 06 Oct 2014 11:20:24 -0500

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