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Now That’s a Headache: Facial trauma and fractures in horses

Many horses can cause trauma on themselves. Usually, those are wounds or cuts on the legs — but sometimes, they’re on the horse’s head.
A picture of a horse's face with cuts on it.
Veterinary Viewpoints: Giving and Receiving Veterinary Medical Advice via Social Media

Thu, Sep 02, 2021

Animal owners often turn to social media for answers to all types of questions including medical advice for their pets and livestock. Online information is abundant but not always accurate, and it may be difficult for some owners to differentiate the good from the bad. Most animal owners are also willing to share their experiences and help others via social media, but depending on the advice given, they may be in violation of the law.

dogscatsHorsesVeterinary ViewpointsCattleCollege of Veterinary MedicineAnimal Health and Sciences
Veterinary Viewpoints: Old McDonald Had a Farm

Tue, Aug 17, 2021

Multispecies farms are common around Oklahoma, and they do bring joy as the song indicates. There are, however, a few considerations when multiple species of animals are housed in proximity to one another. Certain medications, feeds and feed additives that are advantageous to the health of one species can actually be detrimental to other species.

Animal Health and SciencesCattleSheepCollege of Veterinary MedicineHorsesVeterinary Viewpoints
Keep watch on obese horses eating green forage

Tue, May 18, 2021

Obesity in horses is never a desired condition, but especially so for animals that have developed equine metabolic syndrome (EMS), a condition similar to Type II Diabetes in people.

Animal and Food SciencesFerguson College of AgricultureOSU AgricultureAgricultural Sciences and Natural ResourcesOklahoma Cooperative Extension ServiceHorseOutreach and EngagementHorsesOSU ExtensionNews TopicsFood Land and Natural ResourcesForage
Veterinary Viewpoints: Rabies continues to be a threat to pets and livestock

Fri, Apr 30, 2021

While all mammals are capable of being infected with rabies, it’s rare in very small mammals, like rats and squirrels. Raccoons, foxes, skunks and other wild animals are often the source of infection for livestock and other domestic animals. Dogs and cats often get it from fighting with wildlife, while horses, cattle and other livestock are likely to be bitten on the muzzle, udder or feet when encountering wildlife.

catsHorsesCollege of Veterinary MedicineAnimal Health and SciencesdogsCattle
When horses roar: Evaluating the equine upper respiratory tract

Mon, Apr 19, 2021

Horses are exceptional athletes that perform in a wide variety of disciplines. Their muscles use a lot of energy, which is largely produced through a process called aerobic metabolism, using oxygen to convert carbohydrates and fats to ATP, the energy source used by muscle cells.

Animal Health and SciencesCollege of Veterinary MedicineHorses

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