Skip Navigation
Oklahoma State University

Animal Health and Sciences - Archive

Dr. Myers named OSU Vet Med Distinguished Alumnus

Dr. Myers named OSU Vet Med Distinguished Alumnus

Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences recently announced the center’s 2019 Distinguished Alumni Award recipients—Drs. John Myers, Ronald Tyler, Sr., and Paul Welch.

Biosecurity can keep beef cattle operations disease-free

Biosecurity can keep beef cattle operations disease-free

This summer, Oklahoma and the country dealt with a number of disease outbreaks, including vesicular stomatitis, anthrax, and Eastern equine encephalitis. As most beef operations include horses, both cattle and horses faced potential threats. Disease outbreaks highlight the critical importance of biosecurity procedures on every livestock operation. We usually think of applying these plans and procedures to protect against infectious and contagious diseases, but non-contagious diseases should also be considered.

Womble participates in Research Training Program

Womble participates in Research Training Program

Billy Womble spent 12 weeks this summer participating in a research training program at Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. Mentored by Drs. Andrew Hanzlicek and João Brandão, Womble studied clotting times in rabbits and the influence of how the blood sample was handled.

Collaborating to improve the durability of joint replacement implants

Collaborating to improve the durability of joint replacement implants

The Oklahoma IDeA Network for Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) program recently announced its 2019 National Institutes of Health funding awards that include support for a collaborative study involving Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences’ clinician Dr. Erik M. Clary and researchers from OU Health Sciences Center (OUHSC) and the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO).

Oklahoma Quality Beef Network changes announced

Oklahoma Quality Beef Network changes announced

OQBN is a joint project of the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association and the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, one of two state agencies administered by OSU’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.

Two Oklahoma veterinary students attend Canine Conference

Two Oklahoma veterinary students attend Canine Conference

Oklahoma State University veterinary students Brandy Lawrence and Liza Marhanka recently attended the 2019 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference held in St. Louis, Missouri. Both students received a grant to help pay for conference related expenses.

Oklahoma State Veterinary College welcomes class of 2023

Oklahoma State Veterinary College welcomes class of 2023

Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences officially welcomed the class of 2023 at an Induction Ceremony held on the OSU Stillwater campus on Aug. 16, 2019.

Sharing science through ticks

Sharing science through ticks

Thanks to a nearly $4 million grant from the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), researchers from several universities including Oklahoma State University will collaborate on a major research project to better understand tick-borne diseases, how they are acquired, where high-risk areas exist, and how to best subdue these diseases in the Great Plains, specifically in Oklahoma and Kansas.

Summer Research Training Program opens doors

Summer Research Training Program opens doors

Haley Hahn spent 12 weeks this summer participating in a research training program at Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. Mentored by Drs. Bruce Noden, Entomology and Plant Pathology, and João Brandão, Avian, Exotics and Zoological Medicine, Hahn studied external parasites of animals presented to the center’s zoological medicine service and wild Eastern bluebirds.

Prepare a calving kit before fall calving season begins

Prepare a calving kit before fall calving season begins

OSU Extension Circular E-1006, “Calving Time Management for Beef Cows and Heifers,” can help producers get ready for fall calving.

Library offers open textbook incentive

Library offers open textbook incentive

The University Libraries is offering Oklahoma State University faculty members the opportunity to save their students money — while making a little extra of their own.

Wild Turtles are Not Pet Material

Wild Turtles are Not Pet Material

From mid-July through September, thousands of people visit Oklahoma’s lakes, rivers and other waterways to cool off and enjoy their summer. And many of them encounter Oklahoma’s wildlife, as animals also utilize the water and adjacent wilderness. At this time of year, baby turtles are hatching out of eggs buried months earlier. Most egg nests were found and destroyed by raccoons, skunks and other predators. The lucky, undisturbed nests can see 30 to 40 turtles dig themselves out of the soil. They must remain hidden, however, and try to make it to the water and its aquatic vegetation quickly.

Veterinary students participate in Summer Research Program

Veterinary students participate in Summer Research Program

Sixteen veterinary students participated in Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences’ Summer Research Training Program. Designed to identify talented and highly motivated veterinary students interested in exploring a career in veterinary research, the program provides them with an outstanding biomedical research experience.

OSU Veterinary College hosts Partners in Progress

OSU Veterinary College hosts Partners in Progress

Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences hosted “Partners in Progress” a complimentary seminar for the center’s shelter medicine partners. About 15 animal shelter employees from across the state attended the program designed to help shelters learn more about best practices for facility management and handling animals.

Cytauxzoon cats CAN survive: Jackson survives bobcat fever

Cytauxzoon cats CAN survive: Jackson survives bobcat fever

In Oklahoma the survival rate for cats diagnosed with Cytauxzoon felis is less than 25 percent. While cytauxzoonosis or bobcat fever is not a good disease to have, being an infectious disease, in theory, there are treatments for it. And in the case of Jackson, a one-year-old outdoor cat belonging to a Chandler, Oklahoma family, those treatments worked.

Oklahoma livestock operators should be ‘extra vigilant’ for signs of vesicular stomatitis

Oklahoma livestock operators should be ‘extra vigilant’ for signs of vesicular stomatitis

Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease that affects primarily horses and cattle. However, pigs, sheep, goats, llamas and alpacas also can be infected, and on rare occasions humans.

Recognizing histoplasmosis in pet dogs and cats

Recognizing histoplasmosis in pet dogs and cats

There’s a fungus among us! According to the Centers for Disease Control, each year 500,000 people in the U.S. contract histoplasmosis, a potentially fatal fungal infection. Histoplasmosis also infects dogs and cats. In fact, Oklahoma probably sees the most cases of histoplasmosis in pets in the U.S.

OSU parasitologists present at international meeting

OSU parasitologists present at international meeting

Several parasitologists from Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences and the National Center for Veterinary Parasitology, which is housed at the center, recently participated in the 27th Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology held in Madison, Wisconsin.

Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) case confirmed in Oklahoma

Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) case confirmed in Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Department of Food and Forestry announced July 30, 2019 that Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) was confirmed in a Tillman County horse. VSV has been reported in Texas, Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming in 2019. This is the first case in Oklahoma since the 1990s.

OSU veterinarians lead at theriogenology conference

OSU veterinarians lead at theriogenology conference

Veterinarians from Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences were involved in leadership roles at the recent Annual Conference of the Society for Theriogenology (SFT) and the American College of Theriogenologists (ACT).

Dr. Biggs joins OSU Veterinary Center

Dr. Biggs joins OSU Veterinary Center

Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences welcomes Rosslyn Biggs, DVM, as the director of continuing education and beef cattle extension specialist. She comes to the center with 14 years of veterinary experience in large animal practice and public service.

Tots and Turtles

Tots and Turtles

WATCH: Several youngsters were delighted to help Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences release seven tiny turtles at Sanborn Lake in Stillwater.

Milo celebrates 6 months post-surgery

Milo celebrates 6 months post-surgery

Milo, now an 8-month-old Coonhound, and his owner, Jennie Hays of Luther, Oklahoma, joined Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences team to celebrate the puppy’s progress six months post-surgery.

Today’s veterinary care includes specialists

Today’s veterinary care includes specialists

Veterinary care has changed dramatically over the years. While we still treasure the idea of James Herriot taking care of all animals, great and small, veterinary medicine recognizes the benefit of specialists the same way that human medicine does. These specialists spend extra years of training in a narrow specialty to become very knowledgeable in that one area.